Climatic Hazards

The Great Storm of ’87

The great storm of 1987 was a low pressure storm which passed over Britain in the early hours of the morning on the 16th of October 1987. It was formed over the Bay of Biscay when a warm front of air from over Africa met a cold front from the north Atlantic. There was great controversy over the build up of the storm as no warnings were sent out to the British people until the day before.

The storm hit Cornwall first from the south-west on the night of the 15th causing substantial damage. It was believed to have uprooted 14 million trees during its travels over Britain. This lead to troubles with communications, trees fell over roads, onto telephone wires and onto electricity cables. It also effected the timber industry after the storm with a huge fluctuation in prices because these trees were being made into timber and sold.

Summary

Date: 15th – 16th October 1987
Deaths: 21 people from Britain (18) and France (3)
Effects: Power Lose, 14 million trees uprooted, General Disruption to daily life
Recovery Time: Reasonably quick

The Drought of ’76

The 1976 drought brought not only high temperatures but also a prolonged period of very little rain. It caught the people of Britain by surprise as there hadn’t been a drought for a few decades. These dry, hot conditions causes major problems e.g. in St. Ives, 250 acres of woodland was burnt luckily not injuries were caused as 250 people were evacuated to a nearby hospital. The longest reported time without rainfall was 45 days in Milton Abbas, Dorset.

Summary
Date: 22nd of June to 16th July 1976 (temperatures reached 26°c)
Deaths: n/a
Effects: Rising food and water prices, water shortage
Recovery Time: Quick

Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina was among the deadliest hurricance’s to have ever reached the United States. It was formed over the gulf of Mexico before travelling north-east. It then travelled over Florida as a category 3 hurricane reaching very warm waters on the other site, it then ‘re-charged’ or gained more energy. It then travelled northwards over Louisiana and Houston. New Orleans was very badly struck, mainly because of the artificial river levies.

Summary
Date: 23rd – 30th of August 2005)
Deaths: 1,836 people
Damage: $81.2 billion
Effects: Major flooding, many homeless, very little food and water supplies
Recovery Time: Average (not as fast as was expected from the USA)



Primarily Written by: Edd TurtleLast Modified: December 19, 2011

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